A Boxing Day Far, Far, Away..

Jan 072014
 

It’s difficult to preserve memory when your older-self’s revised view constantly overwrites the original impression. How do you file a loving memory of someone you no-longer like? Or childhood memories of wonder, but of things now uncool? Do you owe it to your earlier-self to keep that first impression alive?

SW_yard

One such moment, is a memory of awe and fascination from a lazy summer day in my home town; Boxing Day 1977. The day before, we’d opened presents under our Christmas tree, which was a eucalypt decorated with ornaments and lights (snaffling an Australian-themed Christmas tree was Dad’s own personal tradition). Then we’d had a sunny Christmas lunch outside, under a crabapple tree humming with cicadas. Now Christmas was over, the salvageable wrapping paper was already put away by Mum, and it would be another year before we’d see sweat-soaked Santas in the Australian summer sun, Dad would be complaining about rampant Christmas commercialism again, and the cycle would begin anew.

Hakuna Matata.

My pal Stephen and I sat in my family kitchen thinking of what to do now that Christmas was behind us and we’d “rounded the horn” of the Summer Holidays. As I picked holiday fruitcake out of my braces, Stephen read a movie synopsis from the newspaper about a farmhand from outer-space. I was not like the sophisticated, eyeball-rolling 13 year-olds of today, yet even to me “Luke Skywalker” was the dumbest name I’d ever heard, but a movie with my mates was the best idea I’d heard on that particular Boxing Day, so off we went to watch a new film called STAR WARS.

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In 1977, there weren’t world-wide simultaneous movie releases, and film-prints just crawled from cinema to cinema around the planet, taking 7 months for a mid-year American release to reach my home town. Amazingly, I knew nothing about the cinema sensation of the year, when Stephen and I entered a packed theatre to watch it. First, there was a documentary (an Australian content-quota meant countless naff documentaries) and that night it was about auto-racing and was extra boring, but thankfully the screen went dark when a blown fuse threw the theatre into chaos. We threw lollies at our pal John in the dark, and he lobbed them back at us, while everyone played the fool, rolled Jaffas down the aisle, and called out silly names. After what seemed forever, the power was restored, the audience settled down, the documentary was shelved, and the feature-attraction finally began.

A NEW HOPE
Immediately, I sat up and took notice because Star Wars was way more spectacular than anything I’d ever seen. Without messing about with credits, we were dropped into a budget-blowing opening sequence of battling spaceships, gun fights and robots. I was used to waiting an hour to see anything half as spectacular as the opening shot of this movie. True, Bond films started with action, and that same year, SPY WHO LOVED ME opened with a stuntman skiing off a cliff under a UNION JACK parachute. But first, I’d had to watch Roger Moore’s smirking eyebrow-dance, his alpine snog-sesh, then a cheesy rear-projected ski chase I’d seen before. Star Wars on the other hand, had an opening sequence unlike anything I’d seen, plus aliens and robots, and had the show-stoppingest, climactic action sequence of the year (with Roger Moore’s wrinkly chest nowhere to be seen.)

Seeing Star Wars for the first time at the age of 13 put me in the demographic sweet-spot it was made for, but I remember how much I did not understand in 1977. For example, the movie starts on two robots, then white-armoured troopers arrive, who I thought were robots too. They were led by (I thought) another black-clad robot, using robot-strength to lift a goodie off the deck and bust his neck. I don’t remember when I learned who was a robot and who was human (from a novelisation, I expect) but I watched the movie that first time none the wiser. Unspectacular details also blew my mind in 1977: Aunt Beru serving Luke’s space-lunch with BLUE MILK (Bantha milk perhaps?) WOW. And when Luke slouches off for his teenage-sulk, he stares at a view of not one but two setting suns. WOAH. (I did teen-sulks that year too, but only had the view of Dad’s compost heap at the bottom of our vegetable garden to pose wistfully with.)

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I was floored by Star Wars at 13 years old, but I didn’t see it again before finishing its 1977 run, and in the pre-video age I couldn’t see it whenever I wanted. Thus, for many years, the power of this movie was that it existed largely in my mind, and my life as a day-dreaming fan was under way. I ordered the “Art of Star Wars” book (which eventually fell apart from re-reading) and though I’d already decided on a career in animation, I considered being a movie concept-designer, and drew spaceships and robots in addition to the cartoons I’d drawn for years.

I was too young for 1960s “Beatlemania” (only becoming aware of The Beatles many years after they’d disbanded and John already looked like the Unabomber) but was at ground-zero for its 1970s equivalent; the Star Wars phenomenon. I doubt that a movie will ever have that impact again, simply because the scale of its success was not anticipated. The media-blitz IS anticipated now, and in fact planned for whether we want it or not, and is an attempt to artificially recreate the run-away explosion of interest in (and subsequent consumer purchasing of) Star Wars. Thanks to the media frenzy, there were interviews, behind-the-scenes articles, cultural-theorisings, novelisations, and comics and magazines like never before, and of course, unprecedented merchandising. (That alone left me uninterested. Though I carry the NERD gene, it’s a mutation that leaves me immune to toys).

While awaiting the Star Wars sequel, I sought out director George Lucas’ influences, with mixed results. After wading through LORD OF THE RINGS, a book thicker than our telephone directory, I was outraged to realise by the last chapters that the insufferable band of bloody hobbits, wretched wizards and mincing elves had essentially just decided to do something, and got nowhere near blasted Mordor by the end of the first book. (Structurally the equivalent of Luke Skywalker getting to Mos Eisley; The End.) I hurled the book against the wall in frustration, and never knew what happened next till Peter Jackson ‘read’ the trilogy for me.

EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
When the Star Wars sequel came out a few Christmases later I was 16 years old and a textbook example of a teenage nerd. Reader of comics? CHECK. Animation Aficionado? OF COURSE. Lousy at sports? GUILTY. Lover of sci-fi movies? MAIS OUI. Obsessed with Star Wars? DOUBLE CHECK. Terminally celibate? CHECK and MATE! (Minus the mating part). I’d often imagined what Mr Lucas might do with his next Star Wars film (snort) but EMPIRE STRIKES BACK surpassed all my expectations, and delivered perhaps THE surprise twist of my cinema going life (“His father?! Wha!!”)

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By 1980, I was old enough to baby-sit my siblings and urged Mum & Dad to see the sequel, assuring them it was a masterpiece. While they wasted their date-night seeing MY obsession, we boys teased my 5 year old sister Victoria that she could not be Princess Leia in our Star Wars game (“Aw! I don’t wanna be an Ugnaught!”) Later, the kids were in bed and Mum & Dad retuned. Far from being awestruck, they appeared to give substantially less than even one shit about the movie. When pressed, Mum said, “Well… It’s a bit… LURID, isn’t it, dear.” I was aghast at this tepid reaction, and more so after checking a dictionary;

LURID- Adj: very vivid in color, especially so as to create an unpleasantly harsh or unnatural effect.

What the?! My parents grew up on the serials that inspired Star Wars, but interestingly, the 1970s redo of their childhoods did nothing for them.

Around this time, I learned of a Sydney animation studio and set my sights on getting a job there, gravitating back to my first love of drawing cartoons, but my brain still marinated in a brine of Star Wars, and the obsession strangely broadened my horizons. I read about director George Lucas’ film-maker heroes; about Kurosawa, about John Ford (and others) and when I moved to Sydney to start work, I was finally able to track down their films at art-house and repertory theatres, and learned a lot about cinema history and filmic language. This exciting period is the closest thing I had to film school.

RETURN OF THE JEDI
Christmas of 1983, I was working at Hanna Barbera when RETURN OF THE JEDI arrived in Sydney theatres. I was excited to see how the Star Wars saga wrapped up, and after the previous instalment, my expectations were unbelievably high. Perhaps inevitably, the film itself was anticlimactic. Maybe it was that the Star Wars series was finally (I thought) over? Or was it the failings of the film itself; the unblinking Space Teddy Bears and so on? Perhaps it was because I’d recently been through a lot (Mum died around the previous Christmas). Or simply that I was too old, at the age of 19, and could now see the movie ‘strings and wires’?

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I work within an industry that makes stories for children, and my colleagues and I were called to this life as an extension of our own childhood awe at similar films. In fact, many friends are working on those exact film-series that they loved as children, including Star Wars. “The circle is now complete” (as a certain trouble-maker once said). We Pro-nerds started as child-fans but now make the mind-candy. That must be cool, right? Well, yes and no. We love the process but are now part of the artifice, and no longer feel the magic of these things. Sometimes we must work hard at keeping our pro-present from twisting the feelings of our fan-past.

After a few more years working in Sydney studios in the mid-1980s- a time when it honestly felt that the animation industry was dwindling, and would be dead within 10 years- I travelled while pondering my plan-B career options. I worked for various studios, first in Asia, then in Europe, then the USA, arriving in the very city where the Star Wars movies were made in time for an animation renaissance that revitalised the industry. Before long, I actually worked for George Lucas’ company itself, while he made the first of the Star Wars prequels. I was 35 and despite myself, excited to see what Mr Lucas would do with Star Wars next..

REVENGE OF THE PHANTOM CLONES
..until I saw the movie, that is. While it is very true that STAR WARS changed my life, the PHANTOM MENACE changed it back again, which is perhaps for the best. They are, after all, only movies. A fact that Mr Lucas himself may have forgotten. In 1970s interviews after his Star Wars success, Mr Lucas cited a fun blend of movie serials, comics, and pulp magazines as its foundation. The Joseph Campbell theorising came later, initially offered by others, and George may have gotten drunk on it. When you see yourself as the modern myth-maker laureate, instead of a modern maker of pulp-serials, it’s not surprising that you might forget the essential ingredient of FUN.

Imagine the 1977 Star Wars without Han Solo. Instead, Luke & Obi-Wan are helped by another pontificating Jedi-dude in his spaceship. Structurally, the story would be the same, and I would’ve still loved that version at the age of 13 because, well, I was 13. However, without Han Solo taking the piss out of The Force and the rest of it, anyone older would’ve only had a whiny kid or a pair of ponderous old gits to connect with. To a general audience, Star Wars would’ve been insufferable without Han Solo (and to some extent, The Princess) as the ‘way in’ to the Jedi malarkey. This is essentially what we have in the Star Wars prequels; they are very dour (Yoda used to be a cheeky trickster, remember?) and the only character not bound to Jedi mumbo jumbo is a CGI Rasta duck/rabbit. 13 year olds love it (I would’ve too at that age) but without a likable adult foil the prequels are a ponderous tale about a cult of bearded virgins taking themselves very seriously, and well, if I’d wanted to see that I’d just buy a ticket to Comic Con.

THE NERD APOCALYPSE
Many original-trilogy Star Wars fans have theories about the prequels, and Mr Lucas’ missteps that led him there, and I’m no different. But perhaps the more interesting thing to think about is that WE too lost our perspective? The Phantom Menace is the best value for money ever spent on a movie ticket, because people are still talking about it. What other movie of 1999, or other year for that matter, has given that return on an $8 investment? I myself have participated in many fun geek-out discussions about it, but worry that ‘hating movies’ is the new ‘loving movies’. Fan-love is strong, but has a bitter taste when it curdles, and in the crazy hyperbole of The Internet, many fans even claimed that George Lucas had raped their childhoods.

It was as if the Beatles reformed, but as a polka band, much to the horror of their old fans, who were aghast when the Re-Beatles’ POLKA album found new fans and went triple platinum anyway. The fact that Lucas himself directed the prequels made the anger more intense, and rabid Star Wars fans forgot that these were movies, not holy scriptures, and were supposed to be FUN. Fans complaining that Mr Lucas ruined their childhoods, should relax. If what we fondly remember is a moment in time, and what it meant to us back then, then we still have it.

SW_poster

I saw Star Wars once in 1977 and not again until 1983, and never had a scene-for-scene memory of it, the way some fans do. Yet I had the film indelibly stored inside me anyway, as a collection of memories, feelings and impressions. This, along with photos from magazines, novelisations and comics, became my own personal “Special Edition”, existing only in my head. But if you fetishise the object itself, you are at the mercy of the Nerd/Media complex; that relationship between fans and the companies that own the intellectual properties. When a nerd cherishes an adolescent moment of wonder, the company does too if it centres on a THING that can be sold (and resold) to the nerd.
Q: But what happens if the company (even the original filmmaker) messes with the fetishised object, changing the context of things?
A: Lo, a great wailing and gnashing of teeth that will echo all down the numerous vales of the Internet.

In an old interview with Mr Lucas, he talked of the movie serials he loved as a child, and how surprised he was to later discover that they were actually shoddily made, when he saw them again at film school. For this disconnect to happen, not constantly re-watching the original was a key element in its growth into something else in his mind. As a pro-nerd himself, Mr Lucas processed his disappointment by making something that captured the MEMORY of his beloved serials, but was better made, and STAR WARS was born. For my generation Star Wars was new, and made a huge impression, but my parents saw Star Wars for the slick rehash that it was. Now that I’m middle-aged myself, and neck-deep in rehash after redo, homage after rip-off, ad infinitum, of things I grew up on, I finally understand why Mum & Dad were unimpressed when they saw Empire Strikes Back in 1980. (Verily, I forgive you now, Mum & Dad.)

Keep your cherished childhood impressions free of bitterness by remembering that it’s not only the object (film, book, record or whatever) that you love, but also how old you were, who you were with, the entire place and time itself and your relationship to it. This can never be recreated when simply re-watching that same movie, over and over, but happily, is always part of your internal world, and thus not at the mercy of corporate “re-imaginings” or director’s “re-edits”. Just as Mr Lucas found inspiration for Star Wars in a moment of disappointment with serials from his childhood, hopefully LOADS of material is gestating in the minds of disappointed fans who saw the Star Wars prequels, maybe even a couple that are truly original creations. Cherishing a moment of wonder but then fetishising the film that inspired it is a dead end, but using that feeling to inspire the creation of something new, keeps the flame alive.

If my 13 year old self knew that the two Nerd-Gods of my adolescent world; Walt Disney and George Lucas, would one day be in bed together, my 13 year old brain would be aquiver in febrile anticipation. Now, having been an eager Storm-trooper for both their companies, I’m not so sure. Creatively, it could go either way; bring STAR WARS back to life? Or flog the dead horse into glue? But the fact that Lucasfilm was an Indie film studio, hugely successful yes, but working outside of Hollywood as an independent, means that I was saddened by the Lucas/Disney marriage and to see Lucasfilm consumed.

Hakuna Matata

There are strange moments in Star Wars, viewed now as an adult. If it was intended for children, Luke finding his Aunt and Uncle cooked into beef jerky by Imperial troopers (the only time they ever hit what they aimed at) is a very unsettling image. It was for me, anyway. On the other hand, if it was for grown ups, then Princess Leia’s emotional life is hard to read; she sees her planet and everyone she loved, destroyed, and the next that we see her, she cooly sasses Luke Skywalker for being too short. Smart-arse sociopath? Or still stoned after her visit from the Pusher-Droid™ with the syringe? Her forgetting of Chewie’s Victory Medal (which I was peeved about at 13) could be anti-Wookie racism, but maybe we should give her the benefit of the doubt and chalk it ALL up to her Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.. (Verily, I forgive you now, Princess). Seen today, the disco hair in Star Wars roots it firmly in the era of Donna Summer and the special effects that floored a generation no longer seem so special. In fact, how long before Disney reboots the series altogether? Probably as soon as they have episodes 7, 8, and 9 in the can. I hope they tread carefully, lest they start the unholy rehash-backlash Nerd-Apocalypse II. (I might just sit that one out.)

It’s difficult to make sense of a lifetime of impressions of such an iconic and over-watched movie. I have vivid memories of seeing it for the very first time with the wide-eyed awe of a child, and also with the eyes of an adult who’s seen it umpteen times and aware of its limitations. This constant layering of memory- not just of this movie but of everything in our experience- means that, inevitably, we are ALL Lucas-like in our heads; constantly tinkering with the edits of our lives. So how to sum it all up? Maybe the trick to memory is to hold on to multiple versions simultaneously; the current view AND the younger view… By all means have a REVISED edition, and as many alternate versions as you like, but unlike Mr Lucas, don’t make the mistake of ever taking that original CLASSIC version out of circulation.

———

SW_walk

I have kept alight within me many memories of childhood wonder, trying to hold onto them lightly lest they break, or worse, become twisted. In one of them, it is always Boxing Day 1977 and I am just walking out of the Capitol Theatre with my friends Stephen and John, into an Australian summer evening. Like many people, I’m agog at what I just saw up on that movie-screen, but maybe a little more agog than most. With the perspective of time (and a little self-knowledge) I see why that particular 13 year old kid identifies with the story of a dweeb from a small town in the middle of nowhere and his quest for adventure. Of course I was primed to love this movie of fantasy and escapism, and was on the hook from the first frame till the last, and always will be.

Luke Skywalker whined about not going to Toshi Station to pickup those tasty power-converters, and meanwhile, a few galaxies away, 13 year old me whines that I’ll never fly a spaceship, meet a robot or make friends with a giant alien ape. Walking home, I mention to Stephen what a bummer it is that real life is never going to live up to that movie. I say good night, go inside my house, and sit on the couch. A career in animation is a few years away, adventures around the world are further away, and working for George Lucas himself is even further away and, as my mind joyfully races through the galaxies, I stare at the tinfoil STAR over the shedding Christmas tree…

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  82 Responses to “A Boxing Day Far, Far, Away..”

  1. I just love this! Another great post, and more great leftie drawings! Xxx!!!

  2. Good one James!

  3. We become different people as we age. I am not that 13 year old anymore, nor that 28 year old, that 41 year old, or even the last week me–thank goodness! But while we are no longer those outmoded versions, I think the trick is to hold onto a kernel of that 13 year old inside you. Maybe that’s what Lucas lost as he–as you so aptly put it–got drunk on his Joseph Campbell. I don’t think it’s about the movie that 13 year old once saw. Because if you hold onto that formative essence, that movie will still have freshness. Great films, like all great art, are worth revisiting. Seeing the wires on review doesn’t bother me (unless–sometimes–I can detect that they are the product of not caring–the only cardinal sin?)

    (Speaking of which, I re watched Diamonds Are Forever, as I vowed I would, and I’ll write you later on the results.)

    The Star Wars saga ended for me after Empire. So I love the dumpy, clueless looking Ewok you drew. I am so happy to see new drawings again!!!! You are great, Jamie!!!! (Sorry to get all fanboy–blame the 13 year old!)

    And what was the deal with those Art of SW books? Mine fell apart too. True, I carried it around in my backpack like a talisman everywhere, and loved it to pieces, but I did that with certain other books, and they never fell apart like that one.

  4. Most impressive!

  5. Jamie, these drawings are great! I was going to ask if they were left handed, but Julia answered that. Great style and movement!

  6. Love this drawing!

  7. These are awesome pictures regardless of which hand drew them..but they are especially great being drawn with your left one. You are a very talented Mr Baker indeed. xx

  8. FANTASTIC post man! Love the drawings.

  9. Wow, what a wonderfully sweet and f’ing hilarious read, thanks.

    • This was when I spit out my coffee: “…the prequels are a ponderous tale about a cult of bearded virgins taking themselves very seriously, and well, if I’d wanted to see that I’d just buy a ticket to Comic Con.” Ha! 😀

  10. Your Ewok drawing is the best drawing Ive ever see. (Including Micheagelos)

    • Hi James,
      I agree with one of the above comments that your Ewok rendering definitely encapsulates a certain “je ne sais quo?”
      Keep on Rockin HARD Bro!
      Love Rob.

    • Thanks Rob. I want to go back and add tones to these, but I was getting antsy and posted these anyway.

  11. These drawings are so sweet (wish I had your sense of staging!) and brought back good memories! I remember my dad taking my sis and I to Star Wars instead of yet another re-release of Snow White. We were so angry when we got to the theater and so giddy when we left.

  12. Great post, lovely artwork! Star Wars is a topic I could rattle on for hours on. I had a very similar experience of Star Wars when it first came out. However, I was already so geeky when it came out that I almost didn’t see it because I was already a cynic. But I did see the film and the first Star Wars film still works for me in a way that none of the sequels or prequels ever did, and I still watch it from time to time and can enjoy it without a bit of cynicism or irony.

  13. Just wonderful Jamie! Enjoyed seeing more of your drawings and thought it was clever how you mixed in the Hakuna Matata with this Star Wars post, but the ending gave me a new hope! Thanks for sharing.

  14. Love it!! Thanks for making me laugh this morning, Jamie!!

  15. I really enjoyed reading this one, Jamie. Thanks!

  16. Jamie, your stories are the best! I read them aloud to Annie with a pause to let her appreciate your lovely drawings.

  17. Congratulations, dear boy, on another splendid think-piece deeply pondered and winningly expressed; you’ve certainly got down pat the gift of interlacing the then and now.

    Let me say, too, that I yield to no one in my admiration for your left-handed drawings. Talk about making a shining virtue out of harsh necessity!

    I remember sheepishly that your dear Mum actually went to sleep during our session at the movie, luridness notwithstanding. In my own case, I guess my own comparability with your present standpoint lies somewhat in my viewing now my collection of the Johnny Weismuller Tarzan flicks that so got me in and thrilled me when I was 13 or so. Wendy joins her admiration and love to mine. Dad

  18. Thanks for a wonderful stroll down memory lane James!
    I didn’t see Star Wars until it eventually came on TV a few years later, but it wasn’t hard to see what all the fuss had been about. I was hooked, and in spite of their obvious ‘issues’ I still enjoyed the sequels as well.
    And I remember well the Capitol Theatre … the first movies I saw there were (I think) the Trinity movies … those funny spaghetti westerns … The Towering Inferno and also The Poseidon Adventure. There was also a James Bond movie or two thrown in there as well, and there were probably others, but those were the ones I have the most vivid memories of.
    T’was a rather sad day when they closed the old cinema down and turned it into a discount department store. 🙁

  19. Cracking read lad! Keep up the lefty drawing too

  20. Absolutely delightful, my knee hurts from slapping it (thankyouverymuch).

  21. Thank you, everyone.

  22. I think the Luke Skywalker drawing looks like how you draw yourself! I don’t know if you meant that but it makes it extra cool!

  23. Hey James, Looks like your graphic software can allow you do a kind of digital “aquatint etching” style with speckled grey tones etc. The painter Goya was the first one in history to take full advantage of the analog “aquatint etching” technique (which was brand new in his day-previously it had been just linear etching). I beg you to check out his two aquatint etching editions called “Los Caprichos” & “Disasters of War” respectively. They will Knock Your Scone. They are brim full of Attitude & so are All your recent renderings.
    Respect.
    Rob.

  24. Great piece! I was ten at the time, so this story resonates! Thanks, Gomes!

  25. Jamie, I always LOVE your writings! You make it so fun to read!
    One of my faves,
    (Mum said, “Well… It’s a bit… LURID, isn’t it, dear.” I was aghast at this tepid reaction, and more so after checking a dictionary;)
    hahaha, funny…but I had to check the dictionary to understand this fully, not knowing you already had it in bold, if I’d just kept reading a bit further. hahaha
    Anyway, keep the Nerd alive, my friend!

    Stew

  26. great story Jamie! love these glimpses into your gomer history. and THE DRAWINGS are super charming and kind of elegant in a way. like it’s innocent and mature at the same time. a good combo! Lefty power is strong in you!

    • Thanks Bosco. It took a few months to push through the frustration and accept (and even like) the awkward quality. But I am enjoying drawing again.

  27. Amazing to think that day was such an invisible turning point.

    I’ve just gone through a summer school holidays with my David (now interestingly 13 !) engrossing himself in complex historic movies such as Birds, Rear window, N by NW, Vertigo, Double Indemnity, M, Psycho, Metropolis crimson tide, goodwill hunting …
    Its remarkable to his age group the Lord of the Rings have a similar grip as Star Wars was to us.

    I can remember how rare and hard it was to get ‘star wars’ knowledge or tantalising background stories and the wait for a mail item.

    Davey just grabs the iPad and can be reading a Screenplay in seconds ( a challenge to a mum and dad aren’t too sure he should have unfettered access to Tarantinos deepest thoughts !).

    Anyway wonderful written and agree great sketches – cheers from a hot Australia Day afternoon .

    PDL

    • Peter! How great it is to hear from you! Yes, I think what sets the childhood that children have today apart from the one we used to have is their access to immediate information. And I imagine as a parent, that must be quite challenging!

    • I still have a few more illustrations I’d like to do for this story.

  28. wonderful story Jamie! Great insights in the workings of memory, imagination the power of story. You write very well indeed! together with your very evocative drawings you create a very powerful effect!

  29. OK, so I laughed out loud at the “cult of bearded virgins taking themselves very seriously.” So very you. What I love about the drawings is that they have this light-hearted sketchy quality, juxtaposed with very sophisticated staging and composition. Gorgeous and free.

  30. MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU!

  31. Get out you light sabre and see if it still works!!!

  32. keep this stuff coming I am enjoying it……..LStacchi

  33. The recent EPISODE 7 trailer got me hankering to watch the original movies. I Was bummed though to find out that the Star Wars films are not available on streaming video..

  34. Love this story, James, told with all the insight of adulthood and all the imagination of your childhood self. Your story telling is brilliant. Thanks.

    • Thanks, Ross. It’s hard to overstate how much I loved this movie as a 13-year-old boy. It’s become an absolute cultural icon in the many years since, so there are layers of meaning and memory associated with Star Wars. I tried to incorporate my feelings of the film from that time with all that later knowledge and impressions. I’m very glad that you liked it.

  35. you da man J Dawg!!

  36. I wonder if 2015 Star Wars can measure up to 2015 MAD MAX..

  37. The Mongol invasion of dork culture.

  38. That Ewok drawing perfectly captures their silliness!

  39. Seems like that was in a galaxy far, far away!

  40. I still haven’t seen a single Star Wars movie. True! Don’t see what all the fuss is about….

  41. We stood in a line around the block with little Derek (he was 5)!

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